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Pediatrics. 2015 May;135(5):834-41. doi: 10.1542/peds.2014-0720. Epub 2015 Apr 20.

Point-of-Care Child Psychiatry Expertise: The Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project.

Author information

1
Division of General Academic Pediatrics/Center for Child and Adolescent Health Research & Policy, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; and jvancleave@partners.org.
2
Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
3
Division of General Academic Pediatrics/Center for Child and Adolescent Health Research & Policy, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; and.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Since 2005, after a pilot program, the Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project (MCPAP) has provided point-of-care psychiatry expertise and referral assistance by telephone to primary care providers. We examined its adoption and use and the practice characteristics associated with different adoption timelines and use patterns.

METHODS:

We merged data on calls to MCPAP in 2005 to 2011 with practice data (enrollment year, panel size, regional team assignment). We categorized practices' days from enrollment to first call (adoption) (0-100, 101-365, > 365 days) and quartile of call frequency (use) (annual highest, middle, and lowest quartiles of number of calls per 1000 empanelled patients). We determined associations between adoption and use and practice characteristics using multivariate models.

RESULTS:

Among 285 practices, adoption and use varied: 55% called 0 to 100 days from enrollment and 16% called >365 days from enrollment. Practices in the highest quartile of use made a mean 15.5 calls/year per 1000 patients, whereas the lowest quartile made 0.4 calls/year per 1000 patients. Adoption within 100 days was associated with enrollment during or after 2007 (odds ratio [OR] 4.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.23-7.49) and assignment to the team at the pilot site (OR 4.42, 95% CI 2.16-9.04 for central Massachusetts). Highest-quartile use was associated with team assignment (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.86-6.87 for central Massachusetts) and panel size (OR 0.10, 95% CI 0.03-0.31 for ≥ 10,000 vs < 2000 patients).

CONCLUSIONS:

Adoption and use of MCPAP varied widely. Timing of enrollment, assignment to the team from the program's pilot site, and panel size were associated with patterns of adoption and use. Findings may help other programs design effective implementation strategies.

KEYWORDS:

community pediatrics; psychiatry/psychology

PMID:
25896844
PMCID:
PMC4411776
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2014-0720
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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