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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015 May;24(5):783-9. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1292. Epub 2015 Apr 20.

Prolonged Nightly Fasting and Breast Cancer Risk: Findings from NHANES (2009-2010).

Author information

1
Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, California.
2
Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.
3
Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.
4
Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, California.
5
Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, California.
6
Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. repatterson@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A novel line of research has emerged, suggesting that daily feeding-fasting schedules that are synchronized with sleep-wake cycles have metabolic implications that are highly relevant to breast cancer. We examined associations of nighttime fasting duration with biomarkers of breast cancer risk among women in the 2009-2010 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

METHODS:

Dietary, anthropometric, and HbA1c data were available for 2,212 women, and 2-hour postprandial glucose concentrations were available for 1,066 women. Nighttime fasting duration was calculated using 24-hour food records. Separate linear regression models examined associations of nighttime fasting with HbA1c and 2-hour glucose concentrations. Logistic regression modeled associations of nighttime fasting with elevated HbA1c (HbA1c ≥ 39 mmol/mol or 5.7%) and elevated 2-hour glucose (glucose ≥ 140 mg/dL). All models adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, body mass index, total kcal intake, evening kcal intake, and the number of eating episodes per day.

RESULTS:

Each 3-hour increase in nighttime fasting (roughly 1 SD) was associated with a 4% lower 2-hour glucose measurement [β, 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93-1.00; P < 0.05], and a nonstatistically significant decrease in HbA1c. Logistic regression models indicate that each 3-hour increase in nighttime fasting duration was associated with roughly a 20% reduced odds of elevated HbA1c (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68-0.97; P < 0.05) and nonsignificantly reduced odds of elevated 2-hour glucose.

CONCLUSIONS:

A longer nighttime duration was significantly associated with improved glycemic regulation.

IMPACT:

Randomized trials are needed to confirm whether prolonged nighttime fasting could improve biomarkers of glucose control, thereby reducing breast cancer risk.

PMID:
25896523
PMCID:
PMC4417458
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1292
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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