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Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2015 Apr 1;12:45. doi: 10.1186/s12966-015-0203-7.

Effectiveness of interventions targeting physical activity, nutrition and healthy weight for university and college students: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Ron.plotnikoff@newcastle.edu.au.
2
School of Education, Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Ron.plotnikoff@newcastle.edu.au.
3
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Sarah.costigan@newcastle.edu.au.
4
School of Education, Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Sarah.costigan@newcastle.edu.au.
5
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Rebecca.williams@newcastle.edu.au.
6
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Rebecca.williams@newcastle.edu.au.
7
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Melinda.hutchesson@newcastle.edu.au.
8
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Melinda.hutchesson@newcastle.edu.au.
9
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Sarah.kennedy@newcastle.edu.au.
10
School of Education, Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Sarah.kennedy@newcastle.edu.au.
11
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Sara.robards@newcastle.edu.au.
12
School of Education, Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Sara.robards@newcastle.edu.au.
13
School of Education, Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Jennifer.allen@newcastle.edu.au.
14
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Clare.collins@newcaste.edu.au.
15
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Clare.collins@newcaste.edu.au.
16
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Robin.callister@newcastle.edu.au.
17
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Robin.callister@newcastle.edu.au.
18
School of Humanities and Social Science, Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle, Callaghan Campus, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. John.germov@newcastle.edu.au.

Abstract

To examine the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving physical activity, diet, and/or weight-related behaviors amongst university/college students. Five online databases were searched (January 1970 to April 2014). Experimental study designs were eligible for inclusion. Data extraction was performed by one reviewer using a standardized form developed by the researchers and checked by a second reviewer. Data were described in a narrative synthesis and meta-analyses were conducted when appropriate. Study quality was also established. Forty-one studies were included; of these, 34 reported significant improvements in one of the key outcomes. Of the studies examining physical activity 18/29 yielded significant results, with meta-analysis demonstrating significant increases in moderate physical activity in intervention groups compared to control. Of the studies examining nutrition, 12/24 reported significantly improved outcomes; only 4/12 assessing weight loss outcomes found significant weight reduction. This appears to be the first systematic review of physical activity, diet and weight loss interventions targeting university and college students. Tertiary institutions are appropriate settings for implementing and evaluating lifestyle interventions, however more research is needed to improve such strategies.

PMID:
25890337
PMCID:
PMC4393577
DOI:
10.1186/s12966-015-0203-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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