Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2015 Jul 1;309(1):H222-34. doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.00857.2014. Epub 2015 Apr 17.

Reducing the number of parameters in 1D arterial blood flow modeling: less is more for patient-specific simulations.

Author information

1
Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, St. Thomas' Hospital, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; and.
2
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Thomas' Hospital, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
3
Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, St. Thomas' Hospital, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; and jordi.alastruey-arimon@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Patient-specific one-dimensional (1D) blood flow modeling requires estimating model parameters from available clinical data, ideally acquired noninvasively. The larger the number of arterial segments in a distributed 1D model, the greater the number of input parameters that need to be estimated. We investigated the effect of a reduction in the number of arterial segments in a given distributed 1D model on the shape of the simulated pressure and flow waveforms. This is achieved by systematically lumping peripheral 1D model branches into windkessel models that preserve the net resistance and total compliance of the original model. We applied our methodology to a model of the 55 larger systemic arteries in the human and to an extended 67-artery model that contains the digital arteries that perfuse the fingers. Results show good agreement in the shape of the aortic and digital waveforms between the original 55-artery (67-artery) and reduced 21-artery (37-artery) models. Reducing the number of segments also enables us to investigate the effect of arterial network topology (and hence reflection sites) on the shape of waveforms. Results show that wave reflections in the thoracic aorta and renal arteries play an important role in shaping the aortic pressure and flow waves and in generating the second peak of the digital pressure and flow waves. Our novel methodology is important to simplify the computational domain while maintaining the precision of the numerical predictions and to assess the effect of wave reflections.

KEYWORDS:

1D modeling; aortic pulse wave; digital pulse wave; hypertension; windkessel model

PMID:
25888513
PMCID:
PMC4491523
DOI:
10.1152/ajpheart.00857.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center