Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Can J Psychiatry. 2015 Mar;60(3):127-34.

The national trajectory project of individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder in Canada. Part 4: criminal recidivism.

Author information

1
Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Sociology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. Student, Department of Criminology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec.
2
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Associate Director, Policy and Knowledge Exchange, Douglas Mental Health University Institute Research Centre, Montreal, Quebec.
3
Director of Forensic Rehabilitation Research, Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, Brockville, Ontario.
4
Student, Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec.
5
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia; Senior Research Fellow, Forensic Psychiatric Services Commission, BC Mental Health & Substance Use Services, Coquitlam, British Columbia.
6
National Coordinator, National Trajectory Project, Douglas Mental Health University Institute Research Centre, Montreal, Quebec.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine criminal recidivism rates of a large sample of people found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) in Canada's 3 most populous provinces, British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. Public concern about the dangerousness of people found NCRMD has been fed by media attention on high-profile cases. However, little research is available on the rate of reoffending among people found NCRMD across Canadian provinces.

METHOD:

Using data from the National Trajectory Project, this study examined 1800 men and women in British Columbia (n = 222), Ontario (n = 484), and Quebec (n = 1094) who were found NCRMD between May 2000 and April 2005 and followed until December 2008.

RESULTS:

Recidivism was relatively low after 3 years (17%). There were interprovincial differences after controlling for number of prior criminal offences, diagnosis, seriousness of the index offence, and supervision by the review boards. British Columbia (10%) and Ontario (9%) were similar, whereas Quebec had almost twice the recidivism (22%). People who had committed severe violent index offences were less likely to reoffend than those who had committed less severe offences. People from the sample were less likely to reoffend when under the purview of review boards, across all 3 provinces.

CONCLUSION:

The results of this study, along with other research on processing differences, suggest systemic differences in the trajectories and outcomes of persons found NCRMD need to be better understood to guide national policies and practices.

PMID:
25886688
PMCID:
PMC4394712
DOI:
10.1177/070674371506000307
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center