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Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:259372. doi: 10.1155/2015/259372. Epub 2015 Mar 26.

The electrical activity of the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with TMD and unilateral posterior crossbite.

Author information

1
Department of Orthodontics, Pomeranian Medical University of Szczecin, Al. Powst. Wlkp. 72, 70111 Szczecin, Poland.
2
Department of Conservative Dentistry, Pomeranian Medical University of Szczecin, 70111 Szczecin, Poland.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the influence of unilateral posterior crossbite on the electrical activity of the temporal and masseter muscles in patients with subjective symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunctions (TMD). The sample consisted of 50 patients (22 female and 28 male) aged 18.4 to 26.3 years (mean 20.84, SD 1.14) with subjective symptoms of TMD and unilateral posterior crossbite malocclusion and 100 patients without subjective symptoms of TMD and malocclusion (54 female and 46 male) aged between 18.4 and 28.7 years (mean 21.42, SD 1.06). The anamnestic interviews were conducted according to a three-point anamnestic index of temporomandibular dysfunction (Ai). Electromyographical (EMG) recordings were performed using a DAB-Bluetooth Instrument (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). Recordings were carried out in the mandibular rest position and during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Analysis of the results of the EMG recordings confirmed the influence of unilateral posterior crossbite on variations in spontaneous muscle activity in the mandibular rest position and maximum voluntary contraction. In addition, there was a significant increase in the Asymmetry Index (As) and Torque Coefficient (Tc), responsible for a laterodeviating effect on the mandible caused by unbalanced right and left masseter and temporal muscles.

PMID:
25883948
PMCID:
PMC4391315
DOI:
10.1155/2015/259372
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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