Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Bull World Health Organ. 2015 Feb 1;93(2):93-101. doi: 10.2471/BLT.14.135285.

Screening for tuberculosis and testing for human immunodeficiency virus in Zambian prisons.

Author information

1
Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia, 5032 Great North Road, PO Box 34681, Lusaka, 10101, Zambia .
2
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, United States of America .
3
National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control Programme, Ministry of Health, Lusaka, Zambia .
4
Zambia AIDS Related Tuberculosis Project, Lusaka, Zambia .
5
Zambia Prisons Service, Ministry of Home Affairs, Kabwe, Zambia .

Abstract

in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian, Spanish

OBJECTIVE:

To improve the Zambia Prisons Service's implementation of tuberculosis screening and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing.

METHODS:

For both tuberculosis and HIV, we implemented mass screening of inmates and community-based screening of those residing in encampments adjacent to prisons. We also established routine systems – with inmates as peer educators – for the screening of newly entered or symptomatic inmates. We improved infection control measures, increased diagnostic capacity and promoted awareness of tuberculosis in Zambia's prisons.

FINDINGS:

In a period of 9 months, we screened 7638 individuals and diagnosed 409 new patients with tuberculosis. We tested 4879 individuals for HIV and diagnosed 564 cases of infection. An additional 625 individuals had previously been found to be HIV-positive. Including those already on tuberculosis treatment at the time of screening, the prevalence of tuberculosis recorded in the prisons and adjacent encampments – 6.4% (6428/100,000) – is 18 times the national prevalence estimate of 0.35%. Overall, 22.9% of the inmates and 13.8% of the encampment residents were HIV-positive.

CONCLUSION:

Both tuberculosis and HIV infection are common within Zambian prisons. We enhanced tuberculosis screening and improved the detection of tuberculosis and HIV in this setting. Our observations should be useful in the development of prison-based programmes for tuberculosis and HIV elsewhere.

PMID:
25883402
PMCID:
PMC4339958
DOI:
10.2471/BLT.14.135285
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center