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Antiviral Res. 2015 Jul;119:8-18. doi: 10.1016/j.antiviral.2015.04.004. Epub 2015 Apr 13.

A spiroketal-enol ether derivative from Tanacetum vulgare selectively inhibits HSV-1 and HSV-2 glycoprotein accumulation in Vero cells.

Author information

1
Instituto Universitario de Biotecnología de Asturias, Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias, Spain. Electronic address: alvarezrangel@uniovi.es.
2
Pharmacognosy Research Laboratories, Medway School of Science, University of Greenwich, Central Avenue, Chatham-Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK.
3
Instituto Universitario de Biotecnología de Asturias, Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.
4
Servicio de Microbiología, Laboratorio de Virología, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain.

Abstract

The inhibitory effects of Tanacetum vulgare rhizome extracts on HSV-1 and HSV-2 in vitro replication were assessed. Unlike extracts obtained from the aerial parts, adsorption inhibition and virucidal activities seemed not to be relevant for the observed antiviral action of tansy rhizome extracts. Instead, the most significant effects were the inhibition of virus penetration and a novel mechanism consisting of the specific arrest of viral gene expression and consequently the decrease of viral protein accumulation within infected cells. Through a bioactivity-guided fractionation protocol we isolated and identified the spiroketal-enol ether derivative (E)-2-(2,4-hexadiynyliden)-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]dec-3-ene as the active compound responsible for this inhibitory effect.

KEYWORDS:

Antiviral; HSV; Rhizome; Spiroketals; Tanacetum; Tansy

PMID:
25882624
DOI:
10.1016/j.antiviral.2015.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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