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Food Funct. 2015 May;6(5):1620-34. doi: 10.1039/c4fo01073f.

Myricetin derived from Hovenia dulcis Thunb. ameliorates vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in high choline-fed mice.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Medicinal Resource and Natural Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Food Engineering and Nutritional Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi'an 710062, China. xbyang@snnu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The present study was conducted to explore the protective effects of myricetin (MYR) purified from Hovenia dulcis Thunb. against vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in mice fed with 3% dietary choline water. MYR was shown to possess strong scavenging activities against DPPH˙, HO˙, and O2˙(-) and ferric-reducing antioxidant power in vitro. Mice fed 3% dietary choline water for 8 weeks significantly displayed vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver oxidative stress (p < 0.01). Furthermore, continuous administration of MYR at 400 and 800 mg per kg bw in choline-fed mice could significantly decrease the high choline diet-induced elevation of serum total cholesterol (TC), total triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), endothelin 1 (ET-1) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) levels as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities, while the choline-induced decline of serum high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), endothelin nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) levels could be markedly elevated in mice (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). Meanwhile, MYR at 400 and 800 mg per kg bw also increased hepatic total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities and decreased hepatic malonaldehyde (MDA) and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels in mice, relative to choline-treated mice (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). These results together with conventional haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Oil Red O staining observation of the liver and vascular tissues suggested that MYR exerted a significant protective role against high choline diet-induced endothelial dysfunction and liver injury in mice. This is the first report showing that high intake of dietary choline can induce liver damage and that MYR can ameliorate choline-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and liver injury.

PMID:
25881982
DOI:
10.1039/c4fo01073f
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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