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J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;46(4):989-1005. doi: 10.3233/JAD-143222.

Characterization of Cerebral Damage in a Monkey Model of Alzheimer's Disease Induced by Intracerebroventricular Injection of Streptozotocin.

Author information

1
National Primate Research Center (NPRC), Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Cheongju, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Rehabilitation Science, Graduate School of Inje University, Gimhae, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

In line with recent findings showing Alzheimer's disease (AD) as an insulin-resistant brain state, a non-transgenic animal model with intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (icv-STZ) administration has been proposed as a representative experimental model of AD. Although icv-STZ rodent models of AD have been increasingly researched, studies in non-human primate models are very limited. In this study, we aimed to characterize the cerebral damage caused by icv-STZ in non-human primates; to achieve this, three cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were administered four dosages of STZ (2 mg/kg) dissolved in artificial cerebrospinal fluid and another three controls were injected with only artificial cerebrospinal fluid at the cerebellomedullary cistern. In vivo neuroimaging was performed with clinical 3.0 T MRI, followed by quantitative analysis with FSL for evaluation of structural changes of the brain. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate cerebral histopathology. We showed that icv-STZ caused severe ventricular enlargement and parenchymal atrophy, accompanying amyloid-β deposition, hippocampal cell loss, tauopathy, ependymal cell loss, astrogliosis, and microglial activation, which are observed in human aged or AD brain. The findings suggest that the icv-STZ monkey model would be a valuable resource to study the mechanisms and consequences of a variety of cerebral pathologies including major pathological hallmarks of AD. Furthermore, the study of icv-STZ monkeys could contribute to the development of treatments for age- or AD-associated cerebral changes.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; animal model; brain; monkey; streptozotocin

PMID:
25881906
DOI:
10.3233/JAD-143222
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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