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BMC Endocr Disord. 2015 Apr 2;15:14. doi: 10.1186/s12902-015-0005-6.

The effects of treatment with liraglutide on atherothrombotic risk in obese young women with polycystic ovary syndrome and controls.

Author information

1
Academic Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School, Hull, UK. hassan.kahal@yahoo.co.uk.
2
Centre for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Hull York Medical School, Hull, UK. hassan.kahal@yahoo.co.uk.
3
Diabetes and Endocrinology, Diabetes Centre, York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York, YO31 8HE, UK. hassan.kahal@yahoo.co.uk.
4
Centre for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Hull York Medical School, Hull, UK. A.Aburima@hull.ac.uk.
5
Department of Cardiology, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, UK. drungvaritamas@yahoo.com.
6
Centre for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Hull York Medical School, Hull, UK. asr1960@hotmail.com.
7
Department of Radiology, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, UK. anne.coady@hey.nhs.uk.
8
Department of Sport, Exercise and Health Science, University of Hull, Hull, UK. rebecca.vince@hull.ac.uk.
9
Division of Cardiovascular and Diabetes Research, Leeds Institute for Genetics, Health and Therapeutics, University of Leeds, Multidisciplinary Cardiovascular Research Centre, Leeds, UK. R.Ajjan@leeds.ac.uk.
10
Clinical Biochemistry, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, UK. Eric.Kilpatrick@hey.nhs.uk.
11
Centre for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Hull York Medical School, Hull, UK. Khalid.Naseem@hyms.ac.uk.
12
Weill Cornell Medical College Qatar, PO Box 24144, Doha, Qatar. sla2002@qatar-med.cornell.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with obesity and increased cardiovascular (CV) risk markers. In this study our aim was to assess the effects of six months treatment with liraglutide 1.8 mg od on obesity, and CV risk markers, particularly platelet function, in young obese women with PCOS compared to controls of similar age and weight.

METHODS:

Carotid intima-media wall thickness (cIMT) was measured by B-mode ultrasonography, platelet function by flow cytometry, clot structure/lysis by turbidimetric assays and endothelial function by ELISA and post-ischaemic reactive hyperemia (RHI). Data presented as mean change (6-month - baseline) ± standard deviation.

RESULTS:

Nineteen obese women with PCOS and 17 controls, of similar age and weight, were recruited; baseline atherothrombotic risk markers did not differ between the two groups. Twenty five (69.4%) participants completed the study (13 PCOS, 12 controls). At six months, weight was significantly reduced by 3.0 ± 4.2 and 3.8 ± 3.4 kg in the PCOS and control groups, respectively; with no significant difference between the two groups, P = 0.56. Similarly, HOMA-IR, triglyceride, hsCRP, urinary isoprostanes, serum endothelial adhesion markers (sP-selectin, sICAM and sVCAM), and clot lysis area were equally significantly reduced in both groups compared to baseline. Basal platelet P-selectin expression was significantly reduced at six months in controls -0.17 ± 0.26 but not PCOS -0.12 ± 0.28; between groups difference, 95% confidence interval = -0.14 - 0.26, P = 0.41. No significant changes were noted in cIMT or RHI.

CONCLUSIONS:

Six months treatment with liraglutide (1.8 mg od) equally affected young obese women with PCOS and controls. In both groups, liraglutide treatment was associated with 3-4% weight loss and significant reduction in atherothrombosis markers including inflammation, endothelial function and clotting. Our data support the use of liraglutide as weight loss medication in simple obesity and suggest a potential beneficial effect on platelet function and atherothrombotic risk at 6 months of treatment.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Clinical trial reg. no. ISRCTN48560305. Date of registration 22/05/2012.

PMID:
25880805
PMCID:
PMC4389314
DOI:
10.1186/s12902-015-0005-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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