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Hernia. 2016 Apr;20(2):231-8. doi: 10.1007/s10029-015-1377-2. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

Planned ventral hernia following damage control laparotomy in trauma: an added year of recovery but equal long-term outcome.

Author information

1
MetroHealth Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 2500 MetroHealth Dr., Cleveland, OH, 44109, USA.
2
MetroHealth Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 2500 MetroHealth Dr., Cleveland, OH, 44109, USA. jcomo@metrohealth.org.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Significantly injured trauma patients commonly require damage control laparotomy (DCL). These patients undergo either primary fascial closure during the index hospitalization or are discharged with a planned ventral hernia. Hospital and long-term outcomes of these patients have not been extensively studied.

METHODS:

Patients who underwent DCL for trauma from 2003 to 2012 at a regional Level I trauma center were identified and a comparison was made between those who had primary fascial closure and planned ventral hernia.

RESULTS:

DCL was performed in 154 patients, 47% of whom sustained penetrating injuries. The mean age and injury severity score (ISS) were 40 and 25, respectively. Hospital mortality was 19%. Primary fascial closure was performed in 115 (75%) of those undergoing DCL during the index hospitalization. Of these, 11 (9%) had reopening of the fascia. Of the surviving patients, 22 (19%) never had primary fascial closure and were discharged with a planned ventral hernia. Patients with primary fascial closure and those with planned ventral hernia were similar in age, gender, ISS, and mechanism. Those with planned ventral hernias underwent more subsequent laparotomies (3.0 vs. 1.3, p < 0.001), and had more enteric fistulas (18.2 vs. 4.3%, p = 0.041) and intra-abdominal infections (46 vs. 15%, p = 0.007), and had a greater number of hospital days (38 vs. 25, p = 0.007) during the index hospitalization. Sixteen (73%) patients with a planned ventral hernia had definitive reconstruction (mean days = 266). Once definitive abdominal wall closure was achieved, the two groups achieved similar rates of return to work and usual activity (71 vs. 70%, p = NS).

CONCLUSIONS:

Following DCL for trauma, patients with a planned ventral hernia have definitive reconstruction nearly 9 months after the initial injury. Once definitive abdominal wall closure has been achieved; patients with primary fascial closure and those with planned ventral hernia have similar rates of return to usual activity.

KEYWORDS:

Damage control laparotomy; Open abdomen; Planned ventral hernia; Primary fascial closure; Recurrent open abdomen

PMID:
25877693
DOI:
10.1007/s10029-015-1377-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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