Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Huazhong Univ Sci Technolog Med Sci. 2015 Apr;35(2):176-182. doi: 10.1007/s11596-015-1407-4. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

Analysis of high alert medication knowledge of medical staff in Tianjin: A convenient sampling survey in China.

Author information

1
School of Medicine and Health Management, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430030, China.
2
Department of Pharmacy, TEDA International Cardiovascular Hospital, Tianjin, 300457, China.
3
Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, 510060, China.
4
School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430030, China. hys19810612@163.com.

Abstract

The current situation of medical staff's awareness about high alert medication was investigated in order to promote safe medication and standardized management of the high alert medication in China. Twenty questions were designed concerning elementary knowledge of high alert medications, storage management, medication issues and risks. In order to understand the knowledge level and education status of high alert medication, a convenient survey was conducted among 300 medical staffs in Tianjin. Medical staff's average score of high alert medication knowledge was 12.43±0.27, and the average scores of elementary knowledge of high alert medication, storage management, medication issues and risks were 3.38±0.11, 2.46±0.14, 3.17±0.11 and 3.41±0.12 respectively. Occupation (F=4.86, P=0.003), education background (F=5.57, P=0.019) and professional titles (F=13.44, P≤0.001) contributed to the high alert medications knowledge scores. Currently, the most important channel to obtain high alert medication knowledge was hospital files or administrative rules, and clinical pharmacist seminars were the most popular education form. It was suggested that the high alert medication knowledge level of the medical staff needs to increase, and it might benefit from targeted, systematic and diverse training to the medical staff working in the different circulation nodes of the medications. Further research to develop and validate the instrument is needed.

PMID:
25877348
DOI:
10.1007/s11596-015-1407-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center