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Nat Rev Cancer. 2015 May;15(5):290-301. doi: 10.1038/nrc3911. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

A RASopathy gene commonly mutated in cancer: the neurofibromatosis type 1 tumour suppressor.

Author information

1
Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA.

Abstract

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder that predisposes affected individuals to tumours. The NF1 gene encodes a RAS GTPase-activating protein called neurofibromin and is one of several genes that (when mutant) affect RAS-MAPK signalling, causing related diseases collectively known as RASopathies. Several RASopathies, beyond NF1, are cancer predisposition syndromes. Somatic NF1 mutations also occur in 5-10% of human sporadic cancers and may contribute to resistance to therapy. To highlight areas for investigation in RASopathies and sporadic tumours with NF1 mutations, we summarize current knowledge of NF1 disease, the NF1 gene and neurofibromin, neurofibromin signalling pathways and recent developments in NF1 therapeutics.

PMID:
25877329
PMCID:
PMC4822336
DOI:
10.1038/nrc3911
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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