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PLoS One. 2015 Apr 13;10(4):e0119521. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0119521. eCollection 2015.

Neural correlates of the preserved inhibition of return in schizophrenia.

Author information

1
First-episode Schizophrenia and Early Psychosis Program, Division of Psychotic Disorders, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Psychotic Disorders, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
2
First-episode Schizophrenia and Early Psychosis Program, Division of Psychotic Disorders, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
3
Department of Psychology, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.
4
Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York, United States of America.
5
Psychotic Disorders Program, UMass Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.

Abstract

Inhibition of return (IOR) is an attentional mechanism that previously has been reported to be either intact or blunted in subjects with schizophrenia (SCZ). In the present study, we explored the neural mechanism of IOR in SCZ by comparing the target-locked N1 and P1 activity evoked by valid-cued trials with that evoked by invalid-cued trials. Twenty-seven schizophrenia patients and nineteen healthy controls participated in a task involving covert orienting of attention with two stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs: 700 ms and 1200 ms) during which 64-channel EEG data were recorded. Behavioral reaction times (RTs) were longer in response to valid-cued trials than to invalid-cued ones, suggesting an intact IOR in SCZ. However, reduced N1 amplitude elicited by valid-cued trials suggested a stronger inhibition of attention from being oriented to a previously cued location, and therefore a relative inhibition of perceptual processing at that location in SCZ. These results indicate that altered N1 activity is associated with the preservation of IOR in SCZ and could be a sensitive marker to track the IOR effect.

PMID:
25875486
PMCID:
PMC4395298
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0119521
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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