Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Biometeorol. 2015 Oct;59(10):1461-74. doi: 10.1007/s00484-015-0957-2. Epub 2015 Jan 26.

Oral intake of encapsulated dried ginger root powder hardly affects human thermoregulatory function, but appears to facilitate fat utilization.

Author information

1
Fundamental Nursing, School of Nursing, Shimane University, 89-1 Enya-cho, Izumo, 693-8501, Japan. mmiyamot@med.shimane-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Environmental Physiology, School of Medicine, Shimane University, 89-1 Enya-cho, Izumo, 693-8501, Japan. mmiyamot@med.shimane-u.ac.jp.
3
Department of Environmental Physiology, School of Medicine, Shimane University, 89-1 Enya-cho, Izumo, 693-8501, Japan.
4
Department of Biosignaling and Radioisotope Experiment, Center for Integrated Research in Science, Shimane University, 89-1 Enya-cho, Izumo, 693-8501, Japan.

Abstract

The present study investigated the impact of a single oral ingestion of ginger on thermoregulatory function and fat oxidation in humans. Morning and afternoon oral intake of 1.0 g dried ginger root powder did not alter rectal temperature, skin blood flow, O2 consumption, CO2 production, and thermal sensation and comfort, or induce sweating at an ambient temperature of 28 °C. Ginger ingestion had no effect on threshold temperatures for skin blood flow or thermal sweating. Serum levels of free fatty acids were significantly elevated at 120 min after ginger ingestion in both the morning and afternoon. Morning ginger intake significantly reduced respiratory exchange ratios and elevated fat oxidation by 13.5 % at 120 min after ingestion. This was not the case in the afternoon. These results suggest that the effect of a single oral ginger administration on the peripheral and central thermoregulatory function is miniscule, but does facilitate fat utilization although the timing of the administration may be relevant.

KEYWORDS:

Fat oxidation; Free fatty acid; Gingerol; Heat balance; Shogaol; Thermoregulation

PMID:
25875447
DOI:
10.1007/s00484-015-0957-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center