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AIDS Behav. 2015 Oct;19(10):1888-95. doi: 10.1007/s10461-015-1012-3.

Finding HIV in hard to reach populations: mobile HIV testing and geospatial mapping in Umlazi township, Durban, South Africa.

Author information

1
Medical Practice Evaluation Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Staniford Street, Floor 9, Boston, MA, 02114, USA. ibassett@partners.org.
2
Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. ibassett@partners.org.
3
Harvard Center for AIDS Research, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA. ibassett@partners.org.
4
Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. ibassett@partners.org.
5
Medical Practice Evaluation Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Staniford Street, Floor 9, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
6
iThembalabantu People's Hope Clinic/AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Durban, South Africa.
7
Harvard Center for Geographic Analysis, Cambridge, MA, USA.
8
Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
10
Harvard Center for AIDS Research, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA.
11
Division of General Internal Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
12
Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
13
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
14
Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Mobile, community-based HIV testing may help achieve universal HIV testing in South Africa. We compared the yield, geographic distribution, and demographic characteristics of populations tested by mobile- and clinic-based HIV testing programs deployed by iThembalabantu Clinic in Durban, South Africa. From July to November 2011, 4,701 subjects were tested; HIV prevalence was 35 % among IPHC testers and 10 % among mobile testers (p < 0.001). Mobile testers varied in mean age (22-37 years) and % males (26-67 %). HIV prevalence at mobile sites ranged from 0 to 26 %. Testers traveled further than the clinic closest to their home; mobile testers were more likely to test ≥5 km away from home. Mobile HIV testing can improve testing access and identify testing sites with high HIV prevalence. Individuals often access mobile testing sites farther from home than their nearest clinic. Geospatial techniques can help optimize deployment of mobile units to maximize yield in hard-to-reach populations.

KEYWORDS:

Geospatial analysis; HIV mobile testing; South Africa

PMID:
25874754
PMCID:
PMC4531102
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-015-1012-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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