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Mediators Inflamm. 2015;2015:281985. doi: 10.1155/2015/281985. Epub 2015 Mar 22.

Hydrogen-rich saline protects against ischemia/reperfusion injury in grafts after pancreas transplantations by reducing oxidative stress in rats.

Author information

1
Department of General Surgery, Chengdu Military General Hospital, No. 270, Rongdu Avenue, Jinniu District, Chengdu, Sichuan 610020, China.
2
Chengdu Military Institute for Drug and Instrument Control, No. 44 Yuefu Street, Chengdu, Sichuan 610020, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of hydrogen-rich saline on pancreatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats.

METHODS:

Eighty heterotopic pancreas transplantations (HPT) were performed in syngenic rats. The receptors were randomized blindly into the following three groups: the HPT group and two groups that underwent transplantation and administration of hydrogen-rich saline (HS, >0.6 mM, 6 mL/kg) or normal saline (NS, 6 mL/kg) via the tail vein at the beginning of reperfusion (HPT + HS group, HPT + NS group). Samples from the pancreas and blood were taken at 12 hours after reperfusion. The protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline against I/R injury were evaluated by determining the changes in histopathology and measuring serological parameters, oxidative stress-associated molecules, and proinflammatory cytokines.

RESULTS:

Administration of hydrogen-rich saline produced notable protection against pancreatic I/R injury in rats. Histopathological improvements and recovery of impaired pancreatic function were observed. In addition, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were reduced markedly in the HPT + HS group. Additionally, there were noticeable inhibitory effects on the pancreatic malondialdehyde level and considerable recruitment of SOD and GPx, which are antioxidants.

CONCLUSION:

Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of pancreatic I/R injury in rats, possibly by reducing oxidative stress and inflammation.

PMID:
25873757
PMCID:
PMC4385641
DOI:
10.1155/2015/281985
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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