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Nat Rev Neurosci. 2015 May;16(5):305-12. doi: 10.1038/nrn3939. Epub 2015 Apr 15.

The dopamine theory of addiction: 40 years of highs and lows.

Author information

1
Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology, Division of Brain Sciences, Burlington Danes Building, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN, UK.
2
1] Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology, Division of Brain Sciences, Burlington Danes Building, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN, UK. [2] Centre for Affective Disorders, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK.

Abstract

For several decades, addiction has come to be viewed as a disorder of the dopamine neurotransmitter system; however, this view has not led to new treatments. In this Opinion article, we review the origins of the dopamine theory of addiction and discuss the ability of addictive drugs to elicit the release of dopamine in the human striatum. There is robust evidence that stimulants increase striatal dopamine levels and some evidence that alcohol may have such an effect, but little evidence, if any, that cannabis and opiates increase dopamine levels. Moreover, there is good evidence that striatal dopamine receptor availability and dopamine release are diminished in individuals with stimulant or alcohol dependence but not in individuals with opiate, nicotine or cannabis dependence. These observations have implications for understanding reward and treatment responses in various addictions.

PMID:
25873042
DOI:
10.1038/nrn3939
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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