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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2015 Jun 5;461(3):475-80. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.04.025. Epub 2015 Apr 12.

Acid-base balance and changes in haemolymph properties of the South African rock lobsters, Jasus lalandii, a palinurid decapod, during chronic hypercapnia.

Author information

1
Department of Animal Science, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa. Electronic address: jarredmail@yahoo.com.
2
Institute of Metabolic Physiology, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, D-40225 Düsseldorf, Germany. Electronic address: bridges@hhu.de.
3
Institute of Metabolic Physiology, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, D-40225 Düsseldorf, Germany. Electronic address: janina.krohn@aol.com.
4
Department of Animal Science, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa. Electronic address: LCH@sun.ac.za.
5
Department of Animal Science, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, South Africa; Branch: Fisheries Management, Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Roggebaai 8012, South Africa. Electronic address: Lutz.Auerswald@gmail.com.

Abstract

Few studies exist reporting on long-term exposure of crustaceans to hypercapnia. We exposed juvenile South African rock lobsters, Jasus lalandii, to hypercapnic conditions of pH 7.3 for 28 weeks and subsequently analysed changes in the extracellular fluid (haemolymph). Results revealed, for the first time, adjustments in the haemolymph of a palinurid crustacean during chronic hypercapnic exposure: 1) acid-base balance was adjusted and sustained by increased bicarbonate and 2) quantity and oxygen binding properties of haemocyanin changed. Compared with lobsters kept under normocapnic conditions (pH 8.0), during prolonged hypercapnia, juvenile lobsters increased bicarbonate buffering of haemolymph. This is necessary to provide optimum pH conditions for oxygen binding of haemocyanin and functioning of respiration in the presence of a strong Bohr Effect. Furthermore, modification of the intrinsic structure of the haemocyanin molecule, and not the presence of molecular modulators, seems to improve oxygen affinity under conditions of elevated pCO2.

KEYWORDS:

Acid-base balance; Chronic hypercapnia; Haemoprotein haemocyanin; Molecular structure change; Ocean acidification

PMID:
25871793
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.04.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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