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Med Arch. 2015 Feb;69(1):21-3. doi: 10.5455/medarh.2015.69.21-23. Epub 2015 Feb 21.

Isokinetic Testing in Evaluation Rehabilitation Outcome After ACL Reconstruction.

Author information

1
Institute for physical medicine and rehabilitation "Dr Miroslav Zotović" Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Numerous rehab protocols have been used in rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. Isokinetic testing is an objective way to evaluate dynamic stability of the knee joint that estimates the quality of rehabilitation outcome after ACL reconstruction. Our investigation goal was to show importance of isokinetic testing in evaluation thigh muscle strength in patients which underwent ACL reconstruction and rehabilitation protocol.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

In prospective study, we evaluated 40 subjects which were divided into two groups. Experimental group consisted of 20 recreational males which underwent ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon and rehabilitation protocol 6 months before isokinetic testing. Control group (20 subjects) consisted of healthy recreational males. In all subjects knee muscle testing was performed on a Biodex System 4 Pro isokinetic dynamo-meter et velocities of 60°/s and 180°/s. We followed average peak torque to body weight (PT/BW) and classic H/Q ratio. In statistical analysis Student's T test was used.

RESULTS:

There were statistically significant differences between groups in all evaluated parameters except of the mean value of PT/BW of the quadriceps et velocity of 60°/s (p>0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Isokinetic testing of dynamic stabilizers of the knee is need in diagnostic and treatment thigh muscle imbalance. We believe that isokinetic testing is an objective parameter for return to sport activities after ACL reconstruction.

KEYWORDS:

ACL reconstruction; isokinetic test; rehabilitation

PMID:
25870471
PMCID:
PMC4384850
DOI:
10.5455/medarh.2015.69.21-23
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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