Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Hypertension. 2015 Jun;65(6):1331-40. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.115.05315. Epub 2015 Apr 13.

Gut dysbiosis is linked to hypertension.

Author information

1
From the Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine (T.Y., M.Z., M.G., B.S., M.M.), Division of Gastroenterology, Hematology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine (T.Y., M.Z., M.G., B.S., M.M.), Department of Physiology and Functional Genomics (M.M.S., V.R., J.M.C., M.K.R.), College of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine (V.R., Y.Q., C.J.P.), Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Medicine, Department of Medicine (E.L.), and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (N.A., J.Z.), University of Florida, Gainesville.
2
From the Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine (T.Y., M.Z., M.G., B.S., M.M.), Division of Gastroenterology, Hematology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine (T.Y., M.Z., M.G., B.S., M.M.), Department of Physiology and Functional Genomics (M.M.S., V.R., J.M.C., M.K.R.), College of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine (V.R., Y.Q., C.J.P.), Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Medicine, Department of Medicine (E.L.), and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (N.A., J.Z.), University of Florida, Gainesville. mraizada@ufl.edu m.zadeh@ufl.edu.

Abstract

Emerging evidence suggests that gut microbiota is critical in the maintenance of physiological homeostasis. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that dysbiosis in gut microbiota is associated with hypertension because genetic, environmental, and dietary factors profoundly influence both gut microbiota and blood pressure. Bacterial DNA from fecal samples of 2 rat models of hypertension and a small cohort of patients was used for bacterial genomic analysis. We observed a significant decrease in microbial richness, diversity, and evenness in the spontaneously hypertensive rat, in addition to an increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. These changes were accompanied by decreases in acetate- and butyrate-producing bacteria. In addition, the microbiota of a small cohort of human hypertensive patients was found to follow a similar dysbiotic pattern, as it was less rich and diverse than that of control subjects. Similar changes in gut microbiota were observed in the chronic angiotensin II infusion rat model, most notably decreased microbial richness and an increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. In this model, we evaluated the efficacy of oral minocycline in restoring gut microbiota. In addition to attenuating high blood pressure, minocycline was able to rebalance the dysbiotic hypertension gut microbiota by reducing the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. These observations demonstrate that high blood pressure is associated with gut microbiota dysbiosis, both in animal and human hypertension. They suggest that dietary intervention to correct gut microbiota could be an innovative nutritional therapeutic strategy for hypertension.

KEYWORDS:

butyrates; dysbiosis; hypertension; microbiota; minocycline

PMID:
25870193
PMCID:
PMC4433416
DOI:
10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.115.05315
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center