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Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Aug;39(8):1310-8. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2015.54. Epub 2015 Apr 14.

Metabolic effects of bariatric surgery in mouse models of circadian disruption.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
2
Neurobiology and Neurology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
3
Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Mounting evidence supports a link between circadian disruption and metabolic disease. Humans with circadian disruption (for example, night-shift workers) have an increased risk of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases compared with the non-disrupted population. However, it is unclear whether the obesity and obesity-related disorders associated with circadian disruption respond to therapeutic treatments as well as individuals with other types of obesity.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

Here, we test the effectiveness of the commonly used bariatric surgical procedure, Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (VSG), in mouse models of genetic and environmental circadian disruption.

RESULTS:

VSG led to a reduction in body weight and fat mass in both Clock(Δ19) mutant and constant-light mouse models (P<0.05), resulting in an overall metabolic improvement independent of circadian disruption. Interestingly, the decrease in body weight occurred without altering diurnal feeding or activity patterns (P>0.05). Within circadian-disrupted models, VSG also led to improved glucose tolerance and lipid handling (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Together these data demonstrate that VSG is an effective treatment for the obesity associated with circadian disruption, and that the potent effects of bariatric surgery are orthogonal to circadian biology. However, as the effects of bariatric surgery are independent of circadian disruption, VSG cannot be considered a cure for circadian disruption. These data have important implications for circadian-disrupted obese patients. Moreover, these results reveal new information about the metabolic pathways governing the effects of bariatric surgery as well as of circadian disruption.

PMID:
25869599
PMCID:
PMC4526404
DOI:
10.1038/ijo.2015.54
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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