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Bone. 2015 Aug;77:57-68. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2015.04.004. Epub 2015 Apr 11.

A review of current murine models of multiple myeloma used to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents on tumour growth and bone disease.

Author information

1
Sheffield Myeloma Research Team, Department of Oncology, The University of Sheffield, Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX, UK. Electronic address: j.paton-hough@shef.ac.uk.
2
Sheffield Myeloma Research Team, Department of Oncology, The University of Sheffield, Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX, UK. Electronic address: a.d.chantry@shef.ac.uk.
3
Sheffield Myeloma Research Team, Department of Oncology, The University of Sheffield, Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX, UK. Electronic address: m.a.lawson@shef.ac.uk.

Abstract

Pre-clinical in vivo models of multiple myeloma are essential tools for investigating the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma and for testing new therapeutic agents and strategies prior to their potential use in clinical trials. Over the last five decades, several different types of murine models of multiple myeloma have been developed ranging from immunocompetent syngeneic models, e.g. the 5 T series of myeloma cells, to immunocompromised models including the SCID xenograft models, which use human myeloma cell lines or patient-derived cells. Other models include hybrid models featuring the implantation of SCID mice with bone chips (SCID-hu or SCID-rab) or 3-D bone scaffolds (SCID-synth-hu), and mice that have been genetically engineered to develop myeloma. Bearing in mind the differences in these models, it is not surprising that they reflect to varying degrees different aspects of myeloma. Here we review the past and present murine models of myeloma, with particular emphasis on their advantages and limitations, characteristics, and their use in testing therapeutic agents to treat myeloma tumour burden and bone disease.

KEYWORDS:

Bone disease; Multiple myeloma; Murine models; Tumour burden

PMID:
25868800
DOI:
10.1016/j.bone.2015.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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