Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Dermatol Surg. 2015 May;41(5):550-71. doi: 10.1097/DSS.0000000000000296.

Consensus for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment: basal cell carcinoma, including a cost analysis of treatment methods.

Author information

1
*New York Laser & Skin Care, New York, New York; †Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York; ‡Department of Dermatology, University of Miami, Miami, Florida; §Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; ‖Laser & Dermatologic Surgery Center, Chesterfield, Missouri; ¶Department of Dermatology, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri; #Department of Dermatology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; **Department of Dermatology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in the US population affecting approximately 2.8 million people per year. Basal cell carcinomas are usually slow-growing and rarely metastasize, but they do cause localized tissue destruction, compromised function, and cosmetic disfigurement.

OBJECTIVE:

To provide clinicians with guidelines for the management of BCC based on evidence from a comprehensive literature review, and consensus among the authors.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

An extensive review of the medical literature was conducted to evaluate the optimal treatment methods for cutaneous BCC, taking into consideration cure rates, recurrence rates, aesthetic and functional outcomes, and cost-effectiveness of the procedures.

RESULTS:

Surgical approaches provide the best outcomes for BCCs. Mohs micrographic surgery provides the highest cure rates while maximizing tissue preservation, maintenance of function, and cosmesis.

CONCLUSION:

Mohs micrographic surgery is an efficient and cost-effective procedure and remains the treatment of choice for high-risk BCCs and for those in cosmetically sensitive locations. Nonsurgical modalities may be used for low-risk BCCs when surgery is contraindicated or impractical, but the cure rates are lower.

PMID:
25868035
DOI:
10.1097/DSS.0000000000000296
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center