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J Couns Psychol. 2015 Apr;62(2):115-23. doi: 10.1037/cou0000059.

A randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: an effective treatment for comorbid insomnia and depression.

Author information

1
School of Psychological Sciences.
2
Southern Clinical School.
3
Melbourne Sleep Disorders Centre.

Abstract

Insomnia and depression are highly comorbid conditions that show a complex, bidirectional relationship. This study examined whether cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) delivered by a therapist compared with self-help CBT-I (written materials only) reduces insomnia and depression severity in individuals with comorbid insomnia and depression. A total of 41 participants (18-64 years; 25 females) with comorbid depression and insomnia, treated with antidepressants for at least 6 weeks, were randomized to receive 4 sessions of either CBT-I or self-help CBT-I over 8 weeks. Insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II]) were assessed at baseline, following each session, and at 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes were sleep quality and duration (actigraphy and diaries), anxiety, fatigue, and daytime sleepiness. Compared with self-help CBT-I, BDI-II scores in the CBT-I group dropped by 11.93 (95% confidence interval [CI] [6.60, 17.27], p < .001) more points, and ISI scores dropped by 6.59 (95% CI [3.04, 10.15], p = .001) more points across treatment. At 3-month follow-up, 61.1% of CBT-I participants were in clinical remission from their insomnia and depression, compared with 5.6% of the self-help group.

CONCLUSIONS:

CBT-I administered by a therapist produced significant reductions in both insomnia and depression severity posttreatment and at follow-up, compared with a control condition in which participants received only written CBT-I material. Targeting insomnia through CBT-I is efficacious for treating comorbid insomnia and depression, and should be considered an important adjunct therapy for patients with depression whose symptoms have not remitted through antidepressant treatment.

PMID:
25867693
DOI:
10.1037/cou0000059
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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