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Br J Cancer. 2015 Apr 28;112(9):1575-84. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2015.94. Epub 2015 Mar 24.

Lymphoma incidence, survival and prevalence 2004-2014: sub-type analyses from the UK's Haematological Malignancy Research Network.

Author information

1
Epidemiology and Cancer Statistics Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK.
2
Queens Centre for Oncology, Castle Hill Hospital, Hull HU16 5JQ, UK.
3
St James's Institute of Oncology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds LS9 7TF, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Population-based information about cancer occurrence and survival are required to inform clinical practice and research; but for most lymphomas data are lacking.

METHODS:

Set within a socio-demographically representative UK population of nearly 4 million, lymphoma data (N=5796) are from an established patient cohort.

RESULTS:

Incidence, survival (overall and relative) and prevalence estimates for >20 subtypes are presented. With few exceptions, males tended to be diagnosed at younger ages and have significantly (P<0.05) higher incidence rates. Differences were greatest at younger ages: the <15 year male/female rate ratio for all subtypes combined being 2.2 (95% CI 1.3-3.4). These gender differences impacted on prevalence; most subtype estimates being significantly (P<0.05) higher in males than females. Outcome varied widely by subtype; survival of patients with nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma approached that of the general population, whereas less than a third of those with other B-cell (e.g., mantle cell) or T-cell (e.g., peripheral-T) lymphomas survived for ≥5 years. No males/female survival differences were detected.

CONCLUSIONS:

Major strengths of our study include completeness of ascertainment, world-class diagnostics and generalisability. The marked variations demonstrated confirm the requirement for 'real-world' data to inform aetiological hypotheses, health-care planning and the future monitoring of therapeutic changes.

PMID:
25867256
PMCID:
PMC4453686
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2015.94
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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