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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Apr 10;12(4):3944-61. doi: 10.3390/ijerph120403944.

Relationship between the concentrations of heavy metals and bioelements in aging men with metabolic syndrome.

Author information

1
Independent Laboratory of Medical Rehabilitation, Pomeranian Medical University, Żołnierska 54, 71-210 Szczecin, Poland. iwrot@wp.pl.
2
Department of Biology and Medical Parasitology, Pomeranian Medical University, Powstańców Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland. kodan@pum.edu.pl.
3
Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Pomeranian Medical University, Powstańców Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland. barbara.dolegowska@pum.edu.pl.
4
Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Szamarzewskiego 82/84, 60-569 Poznań, Poland. barbara.dolegowska@pum.edu.pl.
5
Department of Biochemistry and Medical Chemistry, Pomeranian Medical University, Powstańców Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland. chrissaf@mp.pl.
6
Department of Physical Medicine and Functional Diagnostics, Pomeranian Medical University, Żołnierska 54, 71-210 Szczecin, Poland. annalubkowska@gmail.com.
7
Department of Histology and Developmental Biology, Pomeranian Medical University, Żołnierska 48, 71-210 Szczecin, Poland. maria@laszczynska.pl.

Abstract

Heavy metals may exacerbate metabolic syndrome (MS) but abnormal serum concentrations of bioelements may also co-exist with MS. The primary aim of the study was to assess the relationship of blood heavy metal and bioelement concentrations and MS, in men aged 50-75 years. Heavy metals-lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), tungsten (W), Macroelements-magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca), and microelements-iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), selenium (Se) and manganese (Mn), body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio (WHR), abdominal circumference (AC) and blood pressure (BP), total cholesterol (TCh), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride (TG), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin, and Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The men with MS showed statistically significant higher Zn and lower Mg concentrations. Those with diabetes had higher Ca concentration and lower Mg concentration. Cr and Mn concentrations were significantly higher in obese men. The participants with hypertension had lower Mg concentration. We found statistically significant positive correlations (W-TCh, W-LDL, Mg-TCh, Mg-LDL, Ca-TCh, Ca-LDL, Ca-insulin, Ca-HOMAR-IR, Zn-TG, Zn-insulin, Zn-HOMA-IR, Cu-BP systolic, Mn-BMI, Mn-AC, Mn-WHR, Mn-insulin, Mn-HOMA-IR, Se-TCh, Se-LDL, Se-TG, Se-insulin, Se-HOMA-IR, Cr-TCh, Cr-HDL, Cr-LDL, Cr-TG) and negative correlations (Cd-insulin, Hg-WHR, W-insulin, W-HOMA-IR, Mg-BMI, Mg-AC, Mg-WHR, Mg-BP systolic, Mo-insulin, Mn-HDL). Tungsten may contribute to lipid disorders. Magnesium appears to play the protective role in the occurrence of metabolic disorders. Microelements Mn, Cr and Se may intensify MS.

PMID:
25867198
PMCID:
PMC4410226
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph120403944
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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