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Int J Cancer. 2015 Oct 15;137(8):1953-66. doi: 10.1002/ijc.29559. Epub 2015 Apr 28.

Alcohol consumption and the risk of renal cancers in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC).

Author information

1
Genetic Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France.
2
Department of Population Health Research, Cancer Control Alberta, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, Canada.
3
Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
4
Department of Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), INSERM, Villejuif, France.
6
Institut Gustave-Roussy (IGR), Université Paris Sud, INSERM, Villejuif, France.
7
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
8
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition (DIfE) Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany.
9
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece.
10
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
11
Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Greece.
12
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
13
Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute (ISPO), Florence, Italy.
14
Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
15
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
16
Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy.
17
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, United Kingdom.
18
HuGeF Foundation, Torino, Italy.
19
Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
20
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
21
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, United Kingdom.
22
Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
23
Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
24
MRC-PHE, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, United Kingdom.
25
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
26
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
27
Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway.
28
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
29
Department of Genetic Epidemiology, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
30
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Instituto BIO-Donostia, Basque Government, CIBER De Epidemiología Y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), San Sebastian, Spain.
31
Escuela Andaluza De Salud Pública, Instituto De Investigación Biosanitaria, Universidad De Granada, Granada, Spain.
32
CIBER De Epidemiología Y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Granada, Spain.
33
Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), L'hospitalet De Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
34
Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
35
Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain.
36
Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
37
CIBER De Epidemiología Y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
38
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
39
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
40
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
41
School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
42
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have reported that moderate alcohol consumption is inversely associated with the risk of renal cancer. However, there is no information available on the associations in renal cancer subsites. From 1992 through to 2010, 477,325 men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort were followed for incident renal cancers (n = 931). Baseline and lifetime alcohol consumption was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. Information on past alcohol consumption was collected by lifestyle questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. In multivariate analysis, total alcohol consumption at baseline was inversely associated with renal cancer; the HR and 95% CI for the increasing categories of total alcohol consumption at recruitment versus the light drinkers category were 0.78 (0.62-0.99), 0.82 (0.64-1.04), 0.70 (0.55-0.90), 0.91 (0.63-1.30), respectively, (ptrend  = 0.001). A similar relationship was observed for average lifetime alcohol consumption and for all renal cancer subsites combined or for renal parenchyma subsite. The trend was not observed in hypertensive individuals and not significant in smokers. In conclusion, moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a decreased risk of renal cancer.

KEYWORDS:

EPIC; alcohol consumption; cohort study; kidney cancer; renal cell carcinoma; risk factors

PMID:
25866035
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.29559
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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