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Curr Opin Cell Biol. 2015 Jun;34:1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ceb.2015.03.005. Epub 2015 Apr 10.

Networking in the nucleus: a spotlight on LEM-domain proteins.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA; Skirball Institute, Department of Cell Biology, NYU School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
2
Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, 10065, USA.
3
Department of Biochemistry, University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. Electronic address: pamela-geyer@uiowa.edu.

Abstract

Proteins resident in the inner nuclear membrane and underlying nuclear lamina form a network that regulates nuclear functions. This review highlights a prominent family of nuclear lamina proteins that carries the LAP2-emerin-MAN1-domain (LEM-D). LEM-D proteins share an ability to bind lamins and tether repressive chromatin at the nuclear periphery. The importance of this family is underscored by findings that loss of individual LEM-D proteins causes progressive, tissue-restricted diseases, known as laminopathies. Diverse functions of LEM-D proteins are linked to interactions with unique and overlapping partners including signal transduction effectors, transcription factors and architectural proteins. Recent investigations suggest that LEM-D proteins form hubs within the nuclear lamina that integrate external signals important for tissue homeostasis and maintenance of progenitor cell populations.

PMID:
25863918
PMCID:
PMC4522374
DOI:
10.1016/j.ceb.2015.03.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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