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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2015 Jun 1;151:151-8. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.03.016. Epub 2015 Mar 26.

One day access to a running wheel reduces self-administration of D-methamphetamine, MDMA and methylone.

Author information

1
Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, SP30-2400, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
2
Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, SP30-2400, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: mtaffe@scripps.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exercise influences drug craving and consumption in humans and drug self-administration in laboratory animals, but the effects can be variable. Improved understanding of how exercise affects drug intake or craving would enhance applications of exercise programs to human drug users attempting cessation.

METHODS:

Rats were trained in the intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of D-methamphetamine (METH; 0.05 mg/kg/inf), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; 0.5 mg/kg/inf) or methylone (0.5 mg/kg/inf). Once IVSA was established, the effect of ∼ 22 h of wheel access in the home cage on subsequent drug taking was assessed in a two cohort crossover design.

RESULTS:

Provision of home cage wheel access during the day prior to IVSA sessions significantly decreased the self-administration of METH, MDMA and methylone. At the individual level, there was no correlation between the amount a rat used the wheel and the size of the individual's decrease in drug intake.

CONCLUSIONS:

Wheel access can reduce self-administration of a variety of psychomotor stimulants. It does so immediately, i.e., without a need for weeks of exercise prior to drug access. This study therefore indicates that future mechanistic investigations should focus on acute effects of exercise. In sum, the results predict that exercise programs can be used to decrease stimulant drug use in individuals even with no exercise history and an established drug taking pattern.

KEYWORDS:

Bathsalts; Exercise; Reinforcement; Self-administration; Stimulant

PMID:
25863714
PMCID:
PMC4447594
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.03.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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