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Contraception. 2015 Jul;92(1):62-70. doi: 10.1016/j.contraception.2015.03.017. Epub 2015 Apr 9.

Racial and ethnic differences in contraceptive use among women who desire no future children, 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth.

Author information

1
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 532 Scaife Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
2
Departments of Family and Community Medicine, Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, 995 Potrero Ave, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA.
3
Center for Research on Health Care Data Center, University of Pittsburgh, 200 Meyran Ave Suite 200, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
4
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, 4860 Y St., Suites 0101 & 0400, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.
5
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 230 McKee Place, Suite 600, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA; Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, University Drive (151C), ROB 2A112, Pittsburgh, PA 15240, USA. Electronic address: borrerosp@upmc.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate racial/ethnic differences in contraceptive use among women who do not desire future pregnancy.

STUDY DESIGN:

We used the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth to examine the associations between race/ethnicity and 1) use of any contraceptive method at last heterosexual intercourse and 2) effectiveness of contraceptive method used among women who stated that they did not desire any (more) children. We conducted multivariable logistic regression to assess the independent effect of race/ethnicity on these outcomes, adjusting for socio-demographic factors, reproductive characteristics, and indicators of healthcare access and utilization.

RESULTS:

The study sample consisted of 2900 women, aged 15-44 years. The vast majority of women (91.2%) used contraception at last sex, although this varied significantly by race/ethnicity (p<.01). In the fully adjusted model controlling for demographic and reproductive characteristics as well as healthcare access, compared to whites, black women were significantly less likely to use any contraception at last sex (OR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.27-0.73), while there was no significant difference for Hispanic women (OR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.52-1.72). Among women who used a method at last sex, the type of contraceptive method varied significantly by race/ethnicity in bivariate analysis (p<.01), although most women (59%) used a highly effective method. In the fully adjusted model, racial/ethnic differences were no longer significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this nationally representative cohort of women who report that they do not desire (more) children, black women were significantly less likely than white women to use any contraception at last intercourse; this difference did not appear to be due to differential access to health care.

IMPLICATIONS:

Significant racial/ethnic differences exist in contraceptive use among women who have completed childbearing, which do not appear to be explained by differential socioeconomic status, reproductive characteristics or utilization of healthcare. Other factors, including social mobility and locus of reproductive control, that may contribute to these variations should be further explored.

KEYWORDS:

Contraception; Disparities; Race/ethnicity; Unwanted pregnancy

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