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PLoS Biol. 2015 Apr 10;13(4):e1002112. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1002112. eCollection 2015 Apr.

Natural selection constrains neutral diversity across a wide range of species.

Author information

1
Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts, United States of America; Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, United States of America.
2
Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts, United States of America.

Abstract

The neutral theory of molecular evolution predicts that the amount of neutral polymorphisms within a species will increase proportionally with the census population size (Nc). However, this prediction has not been borne out in practice: while the range of Nc spans many orders of magnitude, levels of genetic diversity within species fall in a comparatively narrow range. Although theoretical arguments have invoked the increased efficacy of natural selection in larger populations to explain this discrepancy, few direct empirical tests of this hypothesis have been conducted. In this work, we provide a direct test of this hypothesis using population genomic data from a wide range of taxonomically diverse species. To do this, we relied on the fact that the impact of natural selection on linked neutral diversity depends on the local recombinational environment. In regions of relatively low recombination, selected variants affect more neutral sites through linkage, and the resulting correlation between recombination and polymorphism allows a quantitative assessment of the magnitude of the impact of selection on linked neutral diversity. By comparing whole genome polymorphism data and genetic maps using a coalescent modeling framework, we estimate the degree to which natural selection reduces linked neutral diversity for 40 species of obligately sexual eukaryotes. We then show that the magnitude of the impact of natural selection is positively correlated with Nc, based on body size and species range as proxies for census population size. These results demonstrate that natural selection removes more variation at linked neutral sites in species with large Nc than those with small Nc and provides direct empirical evidence that natural selection constrains levels of neutral genetic diversity across many species. This implies that natural selection may provide an explanation for this longstanding paradox of population genetics.

PMID:
25859758
PMCID:
PMC4393120
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pbio.1002112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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