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Alzheimers Dement. 2015 Nov;11(11):1367-76. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2015.01.008. Epub 2015 Apr 6.

Performance of the CogState computerized battery in the Mayo Clinic Study on Aging.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address: mielke.michelle@mayo.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
3
Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
4
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
7
Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The feasibility and validity of brief computerized cognitive batteries at the population-level are unknown.

METHODS:

Nondemented participants (n = 1660, age 50-97 years) in the Mayo Clinic Study on Aging completed the computerized CogState battery and standard neuropsychological battery. The correlation between tests was examined and comparisons between CogState performance on the personal computer (PC) and iPad (n = 331), and in the clinic vs. at home (n = 194), were assessed.

RESULTS:

We obtained valid data on greater than 97% of participants on each test. Correlations between the CogState and neuropsychological tests ranged from -0.462 to 0.531. Although absolute differences between the PC and iPad were small and participants preferred the iPad, performance on the PC was faster. Participants performed faster on Detection, One Card Learning, and One Back at home compared with the clinic.

DISCUSSION:

The computerized CogState battery, especially the iPad, was feasible, acceptable, and valid in the population.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitively normal; Computerized cognitive battery; Epidemiology; Mild cognitive impairment; Neuropsychology; Population-based cohort study

PMID:
25858683
PMCID:
PMC4595161
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2015.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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