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Patient Educ Couns. 2015 Jul;98(7):884-9. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2015.03.017. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Changing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding cervical cancer screening: The effects of an educational intervention in rural Kenya.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. Electronic address: joelleir@u.washington.edu.
2
Centre for Microbiology Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Nairobi, Kenya.
3
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, University of California, San Francisco, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Cervical cancer screening uptake may be influenced by inadequate knowledge in resource-limited settings. This randomized trial evaluated a health talk's impact on cervical cancer knowledge, attitudes, and screening rates in rural Kenya.

METHODS:

419 women attending government clinics were randomized to an intervention (N=207) or control (N=212) group. The intervention was a brief health talk on cervical cancer. Participants completed surveys at enrollment (all), immediately after the talk (intervention arm), and at three-months follow-up (all). The primary outcomes were the change in knowledge scores and the final screening rates at three-months follow-up. Secondary outcomes were changes in awareness about cervical cancer screening, perception of personal cervical cancer risk, cervical cancer and HIV stigma, and screening acceptability.

RESULTS:

Mean Knowledge Scores increased by 26.4% (8.7 points increased to 11.0 points) in the intervention arm compared to only 17.6% (8.5 points increased to 10.0 points) in the control arm (p<0.01). Screening uptake was moderate in both the intervention (58.9%; N=122) and control (60.9%; N=129) arms, with no difference between the groups (p=0.60).

CONCLUSION:

A brief health talk increased cervical cancer knowledge, although it did not increase screening over simply informing women about free screening.

PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS:

Screening programs can increase patient understanding with just a brief educational intervention.

KEYWORDS:

Behavior; Cervical cancer screening; Health education; Knowledge; Risk perception; Sub-Saharan Africa

PMID:
25858634
PMCID:
PMC4437717
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2015.03.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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