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Am J Infect Control. 2015 Jul 1;43(7):773-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2015.02.029. Epub 2015 Apr 7.

Variation in health care-associated infection surveillance practices in Australia.

Author information

1
Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation, School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: philip.russo@qut.edu.au.
2
Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Infection Prevention and Healthcare Epidemiology Unit, Alfred Health, Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.
3
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry, and Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
4
Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation, School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

In the absence of a national health care-associated infection surveillance program in Australia, differences between existing state-based programs were explored using an online survey. Only 51% of respondents who undertake surveillance have been trained, fewer than half perform surgical site infection surveillance prospectively, and only 41% indicated they risk adjust surgical site infection data. Widespread variation of surveillance methods highlights future challenges when considering the development and implementation of a national program in Australia.

KEYWORDS:

Data quality; Definitions; Method; Prospective

PMID:
25858307
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajic.2015.02.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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