Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Jul;207(1):37-45. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.113.141937. Epub 2015 Apr 9.

Lung function and respiratory diseases in people with psychosis: population-based study.

Author information

1
Krista Partti, MD, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki and Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Finland; Tuula Vasankari, MD, PhD, Finnish Lung Health Association, Helsinki, Finland; Merja Kanervisto, PhD, School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland; Jonna Perälä, MD, PhD, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, and Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland; Samuli I. Saarni, MD, PhD, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki and Hospital District of Southwest Finland, Turku, Finland; Pekka Jousilahti, MD, PhD, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Jouko Lönnqvist, MD, PhD, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki and Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland; Jaana Suvisaari, MD, PhD, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki and Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland krista.partti@thl.fi.
2
Krista Partti, MD, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki and Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Finland; Tuula Vasankari, MD, PhD, Finnish Lung Health Association, Helsinki, Finland; Merja Kanervisto, PhD, School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland; Jonna Perälä, MD, PhD, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, and Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland; Samuli I. Saarni, MD, PhD, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki and Hospital District of Southwest Finland, Turku, Finland; Pekka Jousilahti, MD, PhD, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Jouko Lönnqvist, MD, PhD, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki and Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland; Jaana Suvisaari, MD, PhD, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki and Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is little information on lung function and respiratory diseases in people with psychosis.

AIMS:

To compare the respiratory health of people with psychosis with that of the general population.

METHOD:

In a nationally representative sample of 8028 adult Finns, lung function was measured by spirometry. Information on respiratory diseases and symptoms was collected. Smoking was quantified with serum cotinine levels. Psychotic disorders were diagnosed utilising the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I) and medical records.

RESULTS:

Participants with schizophrenia and other non-affective psychoses had significantly lower lung function values compared with the general population, and the association remained significant for schizophrenia after adjustment for smoking and other potential confounders. Schizophrenia was associated with increased odds of pneumonia (odds ratio (OR) = 4.9), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, OR = 4.2) and chronic bronchitis (OR = 3.8); and with high cotinine levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

Schizophrenia is associated with impaired lung function and increased risk for pneumonia, COPD and chronic bronchitis.

PMID:
25858177
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.113.141937
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press
Loading ...
Support Center