Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMJ Open. 2015 Apr 8;5(4):e007217. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007217.

Description and preliminary results from a structured specialist behavioural weight management group intervention: Specialist Lifestyle Management (SLiM) programme.

Author information

1
Specialist Weight Management Services, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London, UK.
2
Specialist Weight Management Services, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK.
3
Specialist Weight Management Services, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, UK.
4
Theme 8 (Diabetes), Birmingham and Black Country NIHR CLAHRC, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
5
Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar.
6
Public Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK Mannheim Medical Faculty, Institute of Public Health, Social and Preventive Medicine, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
7
Specialist Weight Management Services, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK Theme 8 (Diabetes), Birmingham and Black Country NIHR CLAHRC, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar Department of Medicine, Kings College London, London, UK Department of Diabetes and Specialist Weight Management Service, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Specialist Lifestyle Management (SLiM) is a structured patient education and self-management group weight management programme. Each session is run monthly over a 6-month period providing a less intensive long-term approach. The groups are patient-centred incorporating educational, motivational, behavioural and cognitive elements. The theoretical background, programme structure and preliminary results of SLiM are presented.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

The study was a pragmatic service evaluation of obese patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥35 kg/m(2) with comorbidity or ≥40 kg/m(2) without comorbidity referred to a specialist weight management service in the West Midlands, UK. 828 patients were enrolled within SLiM over a 48-month period. Trained facilitators delivered the programme. Preliminary anonymised data were analysed using the intention-to-treat principle. The primary outcome measure was weight loss at 3 and 6 months with comparisons between completers and non-completers performed. The last observation carried forward was used for missing data.

RESULTS:

Of the 828 enrolled within SLiM, 464 completed the programme (56%). The mean baseline weight was 135 kg (BMI=49.1 kg/m(2)) with 87.2% of patients having a BMI≥40 kg/m(2) and 12.4% with BMI≥60 kg/m(2). The mean weight change of all patients enrolled was -4.1 kg (95% CI -3.6 to -4.6 kg, p=0.0001) at the end of SLiM, with completers (n=464) achieving -5.5 kg (95% CI -4.2 to -6.2 kg, p=0.0001) and non-completers achieving -2.3 kg (p=0.0001). The majority (78.6%) who attended the 6-month programme achieved weight loss with 32.3% achieving a ≥5% weight loss.

CONCLUSIONS:

The SLiM programme is an effective group intervention for the management of severe and complex obesity.

KEYWORDS:

EPIDEMIOLOGY; NUTRITION & DIETETICS

PMID:
25854970
PMCID:
PMC4390730
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007217
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center