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Pharm Biol. 2016;54(2):266-71. doi: 10.3109/13880209.2015.1033560. Epub 2015 Apr 8.

Effects of Heliopsis longipes ethanolic extract on mouse spermatozoa in vitro.

Author information

1
a Academic Area of Medicine, Institute of Health Sciences at Autonomous University of the State of Hidalgo , Pachuca , Hidalgo , Mexico .
2
b Department of Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine at University Autonomous of San Luis Potosi , San Luis Potosi , SLP , Mexico , and.
3
c Department of Molecular Physiology Unit , National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran , Mexico , DF , Mexico.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Heliopsis longipes (A. Gray) Blake (Asteraceae), a plant native to Mexico, is used in traditional medicine as analgesic and microbicide. The main component in the H. longipes ethanolic extract (HLEE) is affinin, as determined by HPLC/UV-visible and NMR measurement. To date, there is no documented evidence on the spermicidal activity of this extract.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to assess in vitro the effectiveness of HLEE as spermicide.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The spermicidal activity of HLEE was evaluated by the Sander-Cramer assay. Spermatozoa were incubated for 20 s with HLEE in concentrations ranging from 75 to 2000 µg/mL to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC) value. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of HLEE was estimated by assaying serial dilutions from the MEC. Additionally, sperms were incubated with 125, 250, or 500 µg/mL of HLEE to evaluate the viability and the integrity of sperm membrane. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay.

RESULTS:

HLEE caused an inhibition of 100% in spermatozoa motility at a MEC value of 2000 µg/mL; the EC50 value was 125 µg/mL. Additionally, exposure to HLEE at 125, 250, or 500 µg/mL for 30 min decreased sperm viability to 27%, 8%, and 2% of the control value, respectively, and significantly increased the percentage of sperms with structurally disorganized membrane. HLEE also increased significantly the level of lipid peroxidation in sperms with respect to controls.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

The results demonstrate the spermicidal activity of HLEE in vitro and suggest that this action is caused by oxidative damage and alterations in the spermatozoal membrane.

KEYWORDS:

Membrane integrity; oxidative damage; spermicidal activity

PMID:
25853976
DOI:
10.3109/13880209.2015.1033560
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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