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Prev Med. 2015 Jul;76:26-30. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.03.022. Epub 2015 Apr 4.

Disparities in long-term cardiovascular disease risk by sexual identity: The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, Program in Health Disparities Research, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware Street, SE, Ste 166, Minneapolis, MN 55414, United States. Electronic address: cjclark@umn.edu.
2
Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware St., SE, Ste. 353, Minneapolis, MN 55414, United States. Electronic address: borow004@umn.edu.
3
Rainbow Health Initiative, 2021 E Hennepin Ave #220, Minneapolis, MN 55413, United States. Electronic address: john.salisbury@rainbowhealth.org.
4
Rainbow Health Initiative, 2021 E Hennepin Ave #220, Minneapolis, MN 55413, United States. Electronic address: Joann.usher@rainbowhealth.org.
5
Independent Researcher, Ponce de Leon Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30308, United States. Electronic address: ralennon@gmail.com.
6
Division of Health Policy & Management, 420 Delaware St. S.E., MMC 729, Minneapolis, MN 55455, United States. Electronic address: prze0009@umn.edu.
7
School of Social Work, University of Minnesota, 105 Peters Hall, 1404 Gortner Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55108, United States. Electronic address: renn0042@umn.edu.
8
School of Social Work, University of Minnesota, 105 Peters Hall, 1404 Gortner Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55108, United States. Electronic address: cfisher@umn.edu.
9
Department of Medicine, Program in Health Disparities Research, 717 Delaware St SE, #166, Minneapolis, MN 55414, United States. Electronic address: saer@umn.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine long-term cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk disparities by sexual identity using a nationally representative sample of young adults in the United States.

METHODS:

Data include participants in wave 4 (2008/09; ages 24-34years) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (7087 females; 6340 males). Sexual identity was self-reported (heterosexual, mostly heterosexual, bisexual, mostly homosexual, homosexual) and a Framingham-based prediction model was used to estimate participants' risk of a CVD event over 30years. Differences in CVD risk by sexual identity, relative to heterosexuals, were calculated with linear regression models adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, education, and financial distress.

RESULTS:

Average 30-year CVD risk was 17.2% (95% CI: 16.7, 17.7) in males and 9.0% (95% CI: 8.6, 9.3) in females. Compared to heterosexual females, mostly heterosexual (0.8%; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.4) and mostly homosexual females (2.8%; 95% CI: 0.8, 4.9) had higher CVD risk. Bisexual and homosexual females had higher but not statistically significant CVD risk compared to heterosexuals. Among males, differences in CVD risk by sexual identity were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSION:

Sexual identity was associated with CVD risk in sexual minority subgroups. Population- and clinic-based prevention strategies are needed to minimize disparities in subsequent disease.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular diseases; Health status disparities; Homosexuality

PMID:
25849883
PMCID:
PMC4559408
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.03.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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