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Brain Imaging Behav. 2016 Mar;10(1):182-6. doi: 10.1007/s11682-015-9380-x.

Effects of active music therapy on the normal brain: fMRI based evidence.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Boezio 24, 27100, Pavia, Italy. alfredo.raglio@unipv.it.
2
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation I.R.C.C.S., Pavia, Italy. caterina.galandra@fsm.it.
3
Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden. luisellasibilla92@gmail.com.
4
Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Baronissi (Salerno), Italy. faesposito@unisa.it.
5
Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Baronissi (Salerno), Italy. francesca.gaeta@hotmail.it.
6
Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Baronissi (Salerno), Italy. fdisalle@unisa.it.
7
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation I.R.C.C.S., Pavia, Italy. luca.moro@fsm.it.
8
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation I.R.C.C.S., Pavia, Italy. irene.carne@fsm.it.
9
Department of Nervous System and Behavioural Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. Stefano.bastianello@unipv.it.
10
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation I.R.C.C.S., Pavia, Italy. maurizia.baldi@fsm.it.
11
Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Boezio 24, 27100, Pavia, Italy. marcello.imbriani@unipv.it.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiological bases of Active Music Therapy (AMT) and its effects on the normal brain. Twelve right-handed, healthy, non-musician volunteers were recruited. The subjects underwent 2 AMT sessions based on the free sonorous-music improvisation using rhythmic and melodic instruments. After these sessions, each subject underwent 2 fMRI scan acquisitions while listening to a Syntonic (SP) and an A-Syntonic (AP) Production from the AMT sessions. A 3 T Discovery MR750 scanner with a 16-channel phased array head coil was used, and the image analysis was performed with Brain Voyager QX 2.8. The listening to SP vs AP excerpts mainly activated: (1) the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal sulcus, (2) the right middle frontal gyrus and in particular the right precentral gyrus, (3) the bilateral precuneus, (4) the left superior temporal sulcus and (5) the left middle temporal gyrus. These results are consistent with the psychological bases of the AMT approach and with the activation of brain areas involved in memory and autobiographical processes, and also in personal or interpersonal significant experiences. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and to explain possible effects of AMT in clinical settings.

KEYWORDS:

Active music therapy; Healthy subjects; Medial prefrontal cortex; Precuneus; fMRI

PMID:
25847861
DOI:
10.1007/s11682-015-9380-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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