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Int J Cardiol. 2015;187:478-85. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.03.386. Epub 2015 Mar 28.

Comparison of the effects of two low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals for secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction in real-world practice: ≥ 50% reduction from baseline versus <70 mg/dL.

Author information

1
Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.
2
Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: myungho@chollian.net.
3
Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The present study compared the effects of two low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals for secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in real-world practice.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Of 3091 consecutive patients with AMI who had baseline LDL-C levels ≥ 70 mg/dL and underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention, 1305 eligible patients who received discharge statin prescriptions were analyzed. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to the values of LDL-C at 1 year in two different manners using percent reduction from baseline (≥ 50% reduction, n=428 versus <50% reduction, n=877) and fixed levels (< 70 mg/dL, n=625 versus ≥ 70 mg/dL, n=680). The primary outcome was defined by the composite of 2-year major cardiac events including cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass grafting after hospital discharge. At 2 years, major cardiac events occurred in 139 patients (10.7%). Compared with <50% LDL-C reduction from baseline, patients with ≥ 50% LDL-C reduction had a 47% risk reduction in major cardiac events (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 0.79; P=0.002). But, compared with LDL-C levels ≥ 70 mg/dL at 1 year, patients with LDL-C levels < 70 mg/dL at 1 year had a similar risk of major cardiac events (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.68 to 1.34; P=0.793).

CONCLUSIONS:

Obtaining a ≥ 50% reduction in LDL-C was associated with better clinical outcomes after AMI in real-world practice, whereas achieving a < 70 mg/dL was not.

KEYWORDS:

Cholesterol; Myocardial infarction; Prevention; Statins

PMID:
25846658
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.03.386
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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