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Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2015 Jun;218(4):407-13. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2015.03.006. Epub 2015 Mar 23.

Urinary arsenic and insulin resistance in US adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, United States. Electronic address: pengq@umich.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, United States. Electronic address: harlow@umich.edu.
3
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, United States; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, United States. Electronic address: sungkyun@umich.edu.

Abstract

Chronic arsenic exposure has been associated with increased diabetes risk in adults. Insulin resistance (IR) has been proposed as a mechanism of arsenic-related diabetes. Although limited evidence in adults found no association between arsenic and IR, the association in adolescents is largely unknown. We examined the association between urinary arsenic and insulin resistance in US adolescents. Eight hundred thirty five adolescents aged 12-19 years, with complete data on urinary arsenic (total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA)), fasting glucose, insulin and key covariates were identified from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles 2003/2004 through 2009/2010. Generalized additive mixed models accounting for intra-cluster correlation arising from the complex survey design were used to estimate the association between the updated Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2)-IR and each type of arsenic. After adjusting for potential confounders, including urinary creatinine, sociodemographic factors, BMI, waist circumference, and arsenobetaine, arsenic exposure was not associated with HOMA2-IR. Interquartile range increases in total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and DMA were associated with 1.5% (95% CI: -2.0, 5.2), 1.1% (95% CI: -1.5, 3.8) and 0.25% (95% CI: -2.3, 2.9) increases in HOMA2-IR, respectively. In conclusion, despite arsenic's association with diabetes in adults and potential role in insulin resistance, our findings do not support the hypothesis that arsenic exposure at levels common in the US contributes to insulin resistance in adolescents. Whether higher doses and longer exposure duration are required for appreciable influence on insulin resistance, or that arsenic does not act through insulin resistance to induce diabetes needs further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Arsenic; Insulin resistance; NHANES

PMID:
25845984
PMCID:
PMC4417072
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijheh.2015.03.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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