Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes. 2015 Aug;64(8):2847-58. doi: 10.2337/db14-1916. Epub 2015 Apr 6.

Dietary Polyphenols Promote Growth of the Gut Bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila and Attenuate High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome.

Author information

1
School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ Nutrasorb, LLC, North Brunswick, NJ roopchand@aesop.rutgers.edu raskin@aesop.rutgers.edu.
2
G.W. Hooper Research Foundation, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
3
School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ.
4
Nutrasorb, LLC, North Brunswick, NJ.
5
School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ roopchand@aesop.rutgers.edu raskin@aesop.rutgers.edu.

Abstract

Dietary polyphenols protect against metabolic syndrome, despite limited absorption and digestion, raising questions about their mechanism of action. We hypothesized that one mechanism may involve the gut microbiota. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) containing 1% Concord grape polyphenols (GP). Relative to vehicle controls, GP attenuated several effects of HFD feeding, including weight gain, adiposity, serum inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]α, interleukin [IL]-6, and lipopolysaccharide), and glucose intolerance. GP lowered intestinal expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase) and a gene for glucose absorption (Glut2). GP increased intestinal expression of genes involved in barrier function (occludin) and limiting triglyceride storage (fasting-induced adipocyte factor). GP also increased intestinal gene expression of proglucagon, a precursor of proteins that promote insulin production and gut barrier integrity. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantitative PCR of cecal and fecal samples demonstrated that GP dramatically increased the growth of Akkermansia muciniphila and decreased the proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, consistent with prior reports that similar changes in microbial community structure can protect from diet-induced obesity and metabolic disease. These data suggest that GP act in the intestine to modify gut microbial community structure, resulting in lower intestinal and systemic inflammation and improved metabolic outcomes. The gut microbiota may thus provide the missing link in the mechanism of action of poorly absorbed dietary polyphenols.

PMID:
25845659
PMCID:
PMC4512228
DOI:
10.2337/db14-1916
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center