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Neuroimage Clin. 2015 Mar 3;7:611-21. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2015.02.020. eCollection 2015.

Low-frequency connectivity is associated with mild traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada ; Neuroscience & Mental Health Program, The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Canada.
2
Division of Neurosurgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
3
Directorate of Mental Health, Canadian Forces Health Services, Ottawa, Canada.
4
Neuroscience & Mental Health Program, The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Canada ; Division of Neurology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
5
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada ; Neuroscience & Mental Health Program, The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Canada ; Division of Neurology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada ; Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
6
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada ; Neuroscience & Mental Health Program, The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Canada ; Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada ; Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Abstract

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) occurs from a closed-head impact. Often referred to as concussion, about 20% of cases complain of secondary psychological sequelae, such as disorders of attention and memory. Known as post-concussive symptoms (PCS), these problems can severely disrupt the patient's quality of life. Changes in local spectral power, particularly low-frequency amplitude increases and/or peak alpha slowing have been reported in mTBI, but large-scale connectivity metrics based on inter-regional amplitude correlations relevant for integration and segregation in functional brain networks, and their association with disorders in cognition and behaviour, remain relatively unexplored. Here, we used non-invasive neuroimaging with magnetoencephalography to examine functional connectivity in a resting-state protocol in a group with mTBI (n = 20), and a control group (n = 21). We observed a trend for atypical slow-wave power changes in subcortical, temporal and parietal regions in mTBI, as well as significant long-range increases in amplitude envelope correlations among deep-source, temporal, and frontal regions in the delta, theta, and alpha bands. Subsequently, we conducted an exploratory analysis of patterns of connectivity most associated with variability in secondary symptoms of mTBI, including inattention, anxiety, and depression. Differential patterns of altered resting state neurophysiological network connectivity were found across frequency bands. This indicated that multiple network and frequency specific alterations in large scale brain connectivity may contribute to overlapping cognitive sequelae in mTBI. In conclusion, we show that local spectral power content can be supplemented with measures of correlations in amplitude to define general networks that are atypical in mTBI, and suggest that certain cognitive difficulties are mediated by disturbances in a variety of alterations in network interactions which are differentially expressed across canonical neurophysiological frequency ranges.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Attention; Depression; Functional connectivity; Magnetoencephalography (MEG); Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI); Neural oscillations; Resting-state

PMID:
25844315
PMCID:
PMC4379387
DOI:
10.1016/j.nicl.2015.02.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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