Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Allergy Asthma Immunol Res. 2015 May;7(3):241-8. doi: 10.4168/aair.2015.7.3.241. Epub 2015 Mar 18.

Interactions between innate immunity genes and early-life risk factors in allergic rhinitis.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Korean Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea.
3
Department of Pediatrics, CHA University School of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea.
4
Childhood Asthma Atopy Center, Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.; Research Center for Standardization of Allergic Diseases, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
5
Childhood Asthma Atopy Center, Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.; Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju, Korea.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan, Korea.
9
Department of Pediatrics, Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
10
Allergy TF, Department of Immunology and Pathology, Korea National Institute of Health, Osong, Korea.
11
Department of Pediatrics, Hallym Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea. imipenem@hanmail.net.
12
Childhood Asthma Atopy Center, Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.; Research Center for Standardization of Allergic Diseases, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. sjhong@amc.seoul.kr.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common chronic disease. Many factors could affect the development of AR. We investigated early-life factors, such as delivery mode, feeding method, and use of antibiotics during infancy, which could affect the development of AR. In addition, how interactions between these factors and innate gene polymorphisms influence the development of AR was investigated.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study of 1,828 children aged 9-12 years was conducted. Three early-life factors and AR were assessed by a questionnaire. Skin prick tests were done. Polymorphisms of TLR4 (rs1927911) and CD14 (rs2569190) were genotyped.

RESULTS:

Use of antibiotics during infancy increased the risk of AR (aOR [95% CI] 1.511 [1.222-2.037]) and atopic AR (aOR [95% CI], 1.565 [1.078-2.272]). There were synergistic interactions between caesarean delivery, formula feeding, and use of antibiotics in the rate of atopic AR (aOR [95% CI], 3.038 [1.256-7.347]). Additional analyses revealed that the risk for the development of AR or atopic AR subjects with the TLR4 CC genotype were highest when all the 3 early-life factors were present (aOR [95% CI], 5.127 [1.265-20.780] for AR; 6.078 [1.499-24.649] for atopic AR). In addition, the risk for the development of AR or atopic AR in subjects with the CD14 TT genotype were highest when all the 3 early-life factors were present (aOR [95% CI], 5.960 [1.421-15.002] for AR; 6.714 [1.440-31.312] for atopic AR).

CONCLUSIONS:

Delivery mode, feeding method, and use of antibiotics during infancy appeared to have synergistic interactions in the development of AR. Gene-environment interactions between polymorphism of innate genes and early- life risk factors might affect the development of AR.

KEYWORDS:

Obstetric delivery; antibiotics; gene-environment interaction, allergic rhinitis; infant food

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for The Korean Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology; The Korean Academy of Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Disease Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center