Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Immunol. 2015 Aug;159(2):163-9. doi: 10.1016/j.clim.2015.03.019. Epub 2015 Apr 1.

The intestinal microbiome and skeletal fitness: Connecting bugs and bones.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, One Jimmy Fund Way, Rm650A, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, One Jimmy Fund Way, Rm650A, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: aaliprantis@partners.org.

Abstract

Recent advances have dramatically increased our understanding of how organ systems interact. This has been especially true for immunology and bone biology, where the term "osteoimmunology" was coined to capture this relationship. The importance of the microbiome to the immune system has also emerged as a driver of health and disease. It makes sense therefore to ask the question: how does the intestinal microbiome influence bone biology and does dysbiosis promote bone disease? Surprisingly, few studies have analyzed this connection. A broader interpretation of this question reveals many mechanisms whereby the microbiome may affect bone cells. These include effects of the microbiome on immune cells, including myeloid progenitors and Th17 cells, as well as steroid hormones, fatty acids, serotonin and vitamin D. As mechanistic interactions of the microbiome and skeletal system are revealed within and without the immune system, novel strategies to optimize skeletal fitness may emerge.

KEYWORDS:

Microbiome; Osteoblast; Osteoclast; Osteoimmunology

PMID:
25840106
PMCID:
PMC4560610
DOI:
10.1016/j.clim.2015.03.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center