Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2015 Jun;35(6):1515-9. doi: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.115.305504. Epub 2015 Apr 2.

High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Phospholipid Content and Cholesterol Efflux Capacity Are Reduced in Patients With Very High HDL Cholesterol and Coronary Disease.

Author information

1
From the Division of Translational Medicine and Human Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
2
From the Division of Translational Medicine and Human Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. rader@mail.med.upenn.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are strongly inversely associated with coronary artery disease (CAD), and high HDL-C is generally associated with reduced risk of CAD. Extremely high HDL-C with CAD is an unusual phenotype, and we hypothesized that the HDL in such individuals may have an altered composition and reduced function when compared with controls with similarly high HDL-C and no CAD.

APPROACH AND RESULTS:

Fifty-five subjects with very high HDL-C (mean, 86 mg/dL) and onset of CAD at the age of ≈ 60 years with no known risk factors for CAD (cases) were identified through systematic recruitment. A total of 120 control subjects without CAD, matched for race, sex, and HDL-C level (controls), were identified. In all subjects, HDL composition was analyzed and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was assessed. HDL phospholipid composition was significantly lower in cases (92 ± 37 mg/dL) than in controls (109 ± 43 mg/dL; P=0.0095). HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly lower in cases (1.96 ± 0.39) than in controls (2.11 ± 0.43; P=0.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

In people with very high HDL-C, reduced HDL phospholipid content and cholesterol efflux capacity are associated with the paradoxical development of CAD.

KEYWORDS:

ABC transporters; coronary artery disease; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

PMID:
25838421
PMCID:
PMC4560933
DOI:
10.1161/ATVBAHA.115.305504
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center