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J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2015 Jul 1;16(7):621-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2015.02.013. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Cognitive Performance: A Cross-Sectional Study on Serum Vitamin D and Its Interplay With Glucose Homeostasis in Dutch Older Adults.

Author information

1
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Elske.Brouwer-Brolsma@wur.nl.
2
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and the EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Geriatrics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrine Section, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
7
Department of Geriatrics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Medical Psychology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

First, the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and cognitive performance was examined. Second, we assessed whether there was evidence for an interplay between 25(OH)D and glucose homeostasis in the association with cognitive performance.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Associations were studied using cross-sectional data of 776 (3 domains) up to 2722 (1 domain) Dutch community-dwelling older adults, aged 65 years or older.

MEASUREMENTS:

Serum 25(OH)D, plasma glucose, and insulin concentrations were obtained. Cognitive performance was assessed with an extensive cognitive test battery. Prevalence ratios (PRs) were calculated to quantify the association between 25(OH)D and cognition; poor performance was defined as the worst 10% of the distribution of the cognitive scores.

RESULTS:

The overall median MMSE score was 29 (IQR 28-30). Higher serum 25(OH)D was associated with better attention and working memory, PR 0.50 (95% CI 0.29-0.84) for the third serum 25(OH)D tertile, indicating a 50% lower probability of being a poor performer than participants in the lowest tertile. Beneficial trends were shown for 25(OH)D with executive function and episodic memory. Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with plasma glucose or insulin. Plasma insulin only modified the association between serum 25(OH)D and executive function (P for interaction: .001), suggesting that the improvement in executive function with high 25(OH)D concentrations is stronger in participants with high plasma insulin concentrations compared with those with low plasma insulin concentrations.

CONCLUSION:

Higher 25(OH)D concentrations significantly associated with better attention and working memory performance. This study does not demonstrate an interplay between serum 25(OH)D and glucose homeostasis in the association with cognitive performance.

KEYWORDS:

Vitamin D; cognition; dementia; plasma glucose; plasma insulin; type 2 diabetes

PMID:
25838206
DOI:
10.1016/j.jamda.2015.02.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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