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Nutrition. 2015 May;31(5):703-7. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2014.11.020. Epub 2014 Dec 20.

Effects of ginger on serum glucose, advanced glycation end products, and inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
2
Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran. Electronic address: Hadtabibi@yahoo.com.
3
Department of Nephrology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
4
Department of Nephrology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
5
Cellular and Molecular Research Department, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
6
Peritoneal Dialysis Unit, Shafa Clinic, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ginger supplementation on serum glucose, advanced glycation end products, oxidative stress, and systemic and vascular inflammatory markers in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD).

METHODS:

In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 36 patients on PD were randomly assigned to either the ginger or the placebo group. The patients in the ginger group received 1000 mg/d ginger for 10 wk, whereas the placebo group received corresponding placebos. At baseline and the end of week 10, serum concentrations of glucose, carboxymethyl lysine, pentosidine, malondialdehyde (MDA), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 (sVCAM-1), and sE-selectin were measured after a 12- to 14-h fast.

RESULTS:

Serum fasting glucose decreased significantly up to 20% in the ginger group at the end of week 10 compared with baseline (P < 0.05), and the reduction was significant in comparison with the placebo group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean changes of serum carboxymethyl lysine, pentosidine, MDA, hs-CRP, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and sE-selectin.

CONCLUSION:

This study indicated that daily administration of 1000 mg ginger reduces serum fasting glucose, which is a risk factor for hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, peritoneal membrane fibrosis, and cardiovascular disease, in patients on PD.

KEYWORDS:

Advanced glycation end products; Ginger; Glucose; Inflammation; Oxidative stress; Peritoneal dialysis

PMID:
25837216
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2014.11.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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